Residential Home Inspection

Aug - 25 2017 | no comments | By

Residential Home Inspection

Do you need a Residential Home Inspection?

Getting a Residential Home inspection by VanPort Property Inspection can help you traverse your way through the buying experience; that’s why most home buyers use a Realtor to help them navigate through the process.

Realtors rely on Home Inspectors to ensure that they represent the home properly and to aid in the closing of the real estate transaction.

The process is complex and most of us don’t have enough personal experience or knowledge to deal with the various interdependent parts to close the purchase.

Having your home inspection can give you an excellent platform from which to operate in any future transactions; whether it be sales or purchase. It can also help you prioritize and plan for continued maintenance costs that every home owner experiences.

What will the residential home inspection tell you?

It will give you assurance that the items below have been examined for functionality and safety:

Drainage, Foundation & Flat work, Roofing, Gutters, Exterior defects & flaws, Interior defects & flaws, Appliance inspection & testing, HVAC examination & testing, Plumbing, Pest inspection and an overall assessment of the homes potential repair/ maintenance concerns.

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with a Residential Home Inspection.

Mobile Home Inspection

Aug - 25 2017 | no comments | By

mobile home inspection

Do you need a Mobile Home Inspection?

Getting a Mobile Home inspection by VanPort Property Inspection can help you insure that your mobile home isn’t hiding any issues.

Process of the mobile home inspection:

Buying your first mobile home can be very exciting and it may also cause a lot of anxiety. The process is complex and most of us don’t have time to deal with the uniqueness of a mobile home purchase. Having a Reliable Home Inspector will make a huge difference in your journey. Your Mobile Home Inspector will take off a tremendous amount of stress by performing his/her home inspection. Having your first mobile home inspection can give you an excellent platform from which to operate in any future transactions; whether it be sales or purchase.

The best thing you can do as a mobile home buyer is to make sure your inspector is dependable and knowledgeable in mobile homes. Ask many questions during your home inspection but don’t get in the way of the Home Inspector. Most home inspectors are very thorough and need space to do their jobs.

What will the first-time home buyer inspection tell you?

Your first-time home inspection will give you assurance that the items below have been examined for functionality and safety:

Drainage, Foundation & Flat work, Exterior defects & flaws, Interior defects & flaws, Appliance inspection & testing, HVAC examination & testing, Pest inspection and an overall assessment of the homes potential repair/ maintenance concerns.

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with a MOBILE HOME Inspection.

Thermography

Jul - 16 2017 | no comments | By

Thermography

VanPort Property Inspection, llc, also performs Thermography as a method of identifying issues with a home or piece of equipment. This is at an additional cost to the client.

Thermography is the process of identifying radiant heat / cold differences in a specific area.

It adds key details from the on board visible light camera to the entire infrared image in real time. The result: an all-in-one, undiluted thermal picture with visible light features that lets you instantly recognize where the problematic heat pattern is.

It can help you uncover missing insulation, drafts, and other hidden energy waste culprits. Find signs of invisible moisture, locate pipes in walls, and much more.

Scan equipment for hot spots signaling loose connections and overloaded circuits to keep homes, businesses, and manufacturing safely up and running.

Thermography makes it easy to spot ductwork gaps and refrigerant issues, see overheating mechanical equipment, and inspect radiant floor heating systems.

Contact the office for pricing and applications. 360.597.8364

Lead in Drinking Water

Jul - 09 2017 | no comments | By

Lead in drinking water

Basic Information about Lead in Drinking Water

VanPort Property Inspection, llc, can test solder joints in older homes (pre 1986) and paint in homes built prior to 1978. Testing of water for lead can be done by various labs or your health department.

Have a question that’s not answered on this page? Contact the Safe Drinking Water Hotline.

EPA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) agree that there is no known safe level of lead in a child’s blood. Lead is harmful to health, especially for children.

How Lead Gets into Drinking Water

Lead can enter drinking water when service pipes that contain lead corrode, especially where the water has high acidity or low mineral content that corrodes pipes and fixtures. The most common problem is with brass or chrome-plated brass faucets and fixtures with lead solder, from which significant amounts of lead can enter the water, especially hot water.

Homes built before 1986 are more likely to have lead pipes, fixtures and solder. The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) has reduced the maximum allowable lead content — that is, content that is considered “lead-free”

Corrosion is a dissolving or wearing away of metal caused by a chemical reaction between water and your plumbing. Many factors are involved in the extent to which lead enters the water, including:

· the chemistry of the water (acidity and alkalinity) and the types and amounts of minerals in the water,

· the amount of lead it meets,

· the temperature of the water,

· the amount of wear in the pipes,

· how long the water stays in pipes, and

· the presence of protective scales or coatings inside the plumbing materials.

To address corrosion of lead and copper into drinking water, EPA issued the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) under the authority of the SDWA. One requirement of the LCR is corrosion control treatment to prevent lead and copper from contaminating drinking water. Corrosion control treatment means utilities must make drinking water less corrosive to the materials it encounters on its way to consumers’ taps.

Health Effects of Exposures to Lead in Drinking Water*

*The health effects information on this page is not intended to catalog all possible health effects for lead. Rather, it is intended to let you know about the most significant and probable health effects associated with lead in drinking water.

Is there a safe level of lead in drinking water?

The Safe Drinking Water Act requires EPA to determine the level of contaminants in drinking water at which no adverse health effects are likely to occur with an adequate margin of safety. These non-enforceable health goals, based solely on possible health risks, are called maximum contaminant level goals (MCLGs). EPA has set the maximum contaminant level goal for lead in drinking water at zero because lead is a toxic metal that can be harmful to human health even at low exposure levels. Lead is persistent, and it can bioaccumulate in the body over time.

Young children, infants, and fetuses are particularly vulnerable to lead because the physical and behavioral effects of lead occur at lower exposure levels in children than in adults. A dose of lead that would have little effect on an adult can have a significant effect on a child. In children, low levels of exposure have been linked to damage to the central and peripheral nervous system, learning disabilities, shorter stature, impaired hearing, and impaired formation and function of blood cells.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that public health actions be initiated when the level of lead in a child’s blood is 5 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL) or more.

It is important to recognize all the ways a child can be exposed to lead. Children are exposed to lead in paint, dust, soil, air, and food, as well as drinking water. If the level of lead in a child’s blood is at or above the CDC action level of 5 micrograms per deciliter, it may be due to lead exposures from a combination of sources. EPA estimates that drinking water can make up 20 percent or more of a person’s total exposure to lead. Infants who consume mostly mixed formula can receive 40 percent to 60 percent of their exposure to lead from drinking water.

Can I shower in lead-contaminated water?

Yes. Bathing and showering should be safe for you and your children, even if the water contains lead over EPA’s action level. Human skin does not absorb lead in water.

First, learn more about the water coming into your home

EPA requires all community water systems to prepare and deliver an annual water quality report called a Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) for their customers by July 1 of each year.

Second, you can have your water tested for lead

Homes may have internal plumbing materials containing lead. Since you cannot see, taste, or smell lead dissolved in water, testing is the only sure way of telling whether there are harmful quantities of lead in your drinking water. A list of certified laboratories is available from your state or local drinking water authority. Testing costs between $20 and $100.

For more information go to the EPA or CDC website.

Radon Testing

May - 18 2017 | no comments | By

Radon Testing

VanPort Property Inspection, llc does ACTIVE RADON TESTING

Our testing unit(s) continuously measure and record the amount of radon or its decay products in the air. Our devices provide a digital report of this information which can reveal short term and long term test results. Single test units are placed in a home and the results are retrieved within 24 hours. If part of a Home Inspection, the units are typically placed in the home 24>72 hours prior to the inspection taking place; the results are then made part of the inspection report. Long term testing, 1 week or more is also available.

RADON WHAT IT IS

Radon is a chemical element with symbol Rn and atomic number 86. It is a radioactive, colorless, odorless, tasteless noble gas. It occurs naturally as an intermediate step in the normal radioactive decay chains through which thorium and uranium slowly decay into lead; radon, itself, is a decay product of radium. Its most stable isotope, ²²²Rn, has a half-life of 3.8 days. Since thorium and uranium are two of the most common radioactive elements on Earth, and since their isotopes have very long half-lives, on the order of billions of years, radon will be present long into the future. Radon is naturally occurring at 0.3pCi/L all around us all the time.

What is the immediate health concern to YOU

There are many stores out and about “RADON”. Some level of concern is warranted by everyone. It is important to understand some of the science so you can make a calm and rational decision about the risk factors. Radon, according to the EPA can cause cancer. EPA STATES: The results of their analysis demonstrated a slightly increased risk of lung cancer for individuals with elevated exposure to household radon. There are 15K>22K deaths related to radon in the USA every year.

That equates to 4.8 deaths related to Radon per 1,000 people. Smokers, former smokers, those exposed to 2nd hand smoke and Radon rates over 2.0pCi/L are at markedly increased risk of developing lung cancers over those who are never around smoke. Occupational and recreational contaminants, and other related contributory factors can also contribute to the development of Radon poisoning. Simply put, for the home buyer/ owner, the problem is mitigatable and it need not be that expensive to do so. Testing is the first step; this will inform you of the potential risk factors. Remediation, if needed, can dramatically reduce the level of exposure in the home.

REMEDIATION Through Active Soil Depressurization

ASD radon abatement is performed by 1) sucking air out from under the house by use of a fan system which lowers air pressure (in the sump) under basement slab. 2) exchanges air under the house using fans or 3) installation of a system similar to #1 above but using a non-permeable barrier where there is no concrete floor (dirt crawl space) and providing suction under the non-permeable barrier.

Air moves from high pressure to lower pressure, thus radon gas will move to the low-pressure area created by the fan system.

For most homes, built with crawl spaces, keeping your foundation vents open all of the time is one of the simplest ways to mitigate radon. Since our weather is rarely below the freezing stage, there should never be blocked vents except when the temperatures drop below freezing. Once the temperature rises, then you should remove the vents to allow for the free movement of air.

A trained professional can get your radon level down below +/-0.2pCi/L. But most labs will only give results that read <0.3pCi/L since this is about the average outdoor level in the United States. <4.0pCi/L is considered to be the highest level acceptable by the EPA

Is it Safe to Buy a Home With an Elevated Radon Level?

May - 18 2017 | no comments | By

Is It Safe to Buy a Home With an Elevated Radon Level?

This odorless gas is deadly serious, but addressing the problem is easy

By Paul Hope

February 15, 2017 Published in Consumer Reports

Is It Safe to Buy a Home With an Elevated Radon Level?

Buying a house can be a bit like falling in love. You shop around, seek advice from friends, and when you find the perfect match, lay it all on the line and pop the question. But even after a seller has said yes to your offer, you’ll need to complete a home inspection, which often includes a radon test.

Radon test results usually arrive a week or two after your home inspection report and can be riddled with terrifying facts about this deadly gas. If it reveals high levels, you may be left wondering whether you should walk away from the sale. You don’t have to. Here’s why.

A Radon Problem Can Be Fixed

Radon-related lung cancer kills an alarming 21,000 people each year, a tragedy multiplied by the fact that significant exposure to the gas can be easily remedied. The scope of the work depends on the level of gas and the style of your house, but it’s pretty simple and not overly expensive.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, radon is found in every state. It’s a naturally occurring radioactive gas produced by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Because the air pressure inside a house is typically lower than the pressure in the soil around its foundation, radon is drawn into the home through cracks in the foundation and other openings. Radon levels are measured in picocuries per liter, or pCi/L. Levels of 4 pCi/L or higher are considered hazardous. Radon levels less than 4 pCi/L still pose a risk and in many cases, can be reduced, although it is difficult to reduce levels below .2 pCi/L.

The EPA estimates that a radon removal system costs about $1,200 for an average house. The system is usually comprised of one or more PVC pipes that run from the radon-emitting soil beneath a home up through the roof. An in-line fan draws air through the system so that it doesn’t leach into living spaces. Once installed, a follow-up radon test is done. Even in houses with extremely high radon levels, you can expect a drop to levels considered safe.

You Can Ask for a Seller Credit

If a radon test reveals high levels—anything above 4 pCi/L—ask for a walk-through with an EPA-licensed radon remediation specialist. You can find one through your state radon office. Most will provide a free remediation estimate, and, if the work is done, guarantee that radon levels will be acceptable.

Ask the seller for a price reduction that covers the estimated cost of remediation. If the seller balks, have your agent remind his or her agent that it’s a problem other buyers are likely to encounter as well. Depending on your state, the agent may even be required by law to disclose the radon test results to other potential buyers on a seller’s disclosure form.

A Single Radon Test Offers Only a Snapshot

Relying on just one radon test done as part of a home inspection is a mistake, even if it reveals that the home has safe levels. In our tests, test kits that measure long-term levels—90 days or more—were far more accurate than the one-week tests used by most home inspectors. That’s because radon levels fluctuate day to day and season to season. In our evaluation, only one short-term radon test was accurate enough for us to recommend. Two kits undercounted radon levels by almost 40 percent. So by all means, let your home inspector test for radon and use the results as a bargaining chip to ask a seller for a credit if radon is detected. Just don’t think of it as the final word. You’ll still want a more thorough radon test done after the sale has closed. Need more info? Check the radon information section of the EPA’s website. If you’re buying or selling a home, print out the EPA’s pamphlet on radon and keep it with your files.

New Construction Inspection

Jan - 15 2017 | no comments | By

new construction inspection

Getting a new construction inspection with VanPort Property Inspection can avoid ‘surprises’ prior to closing with the builder. New construction inspections reduce the surprises that generally don’t show up until well after the sale has been completed. It will give you an opportunity to mitigate potential future problems after the sale.

New Construction Inspection Advantages

New construction inspections are performed before the home is done either just prior to closing. The inspection will give you a snapshot of any issues and give the builder an opportunity to repair any issues found.

Builders have several things riding on their sale to you. Primarily their reputation which could further complement their product and workmanship. Word of mouth and social media exposure, both good or bad can help them tremendously.

Builder Inspections

Builders build to code, that doesn’t necessarily translate into functionality. Failure to install flashing, complete caulking of points of intrusion, wood debris left in the crawl space or any number of things can lead to costly repairs or loss of value in the long run.

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with a NEW CONSTRUCTION inspection.

Getting an Eleventh Month Inspection

Jan - 14 2017 | no comments | By

getting an eleventh month inspection

Are you getting an Eleventh Month Inspection?

Getting an eleventh month inspection through VanPort Property Inspection can identify post sale issues, prior to the expiration of the warranty. This is normally offered by builders on the sale of a new home.

What is an Eleventh Month Inspection?

Home Inspections are done to help determine the conditions of a home or property.

Most Inspectors will inspect the structure, heating systems, plumbing and electrical conditions. This helps buyers make good decisions on their potential purchase plus identify any problems with the property that may need attention.

11th month inspections are done because in the United States, builders are required to provide a Warranty on the building for up to a year. Therefore, most buyers have their homes inspected before the building warranty expires normally on the eleventh month.

Eleventh month inspections will help you and your builder deal with issues that take time to develop. Similar to  buying a new pair of shoes and trying them on for fit. Then realizing that after walking around in them that they aren’t as appealing as they were in the store display.

Unfortunately if you wait for the ‘builders warranty’ to expire, then you are in no position to go back to the builder and bring to their attention issues that have arisen.

When should you get an Eleventh Month Inspection?

Eleventh month inspections should be performed well before the home warranty expires; preferably in the ninth month. This will give you and the builder time to address those issues that developed over time once the structure has had time to be put through its paces.

Builder Inspections

Builders build to code that doesn’t necessarily translate into functionality. Failure to install flashing, complete caulking of points of intrusion, wood debris left in the crawl space or any number of things can lead to costly repairs or loss of value in the long run.

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with a ELEVENTH MONTH inspection.

Dry Rot Inspection

Jan - 14 2017 | no comments | By

Getting a Dry Rot Inspection

Are you getting a Dry Rot Inspection?

Getting a DRY ROT inspection through VanPort Property Inspection can help you avoid ‘surprises’ prior to your warranty expiring with the builder. These inspections help with the Pre- purchase, sale or in the event you notice a dry rot Treatment company working in the area.

What is Dry Rot?

Dry rot in homes is the decay of Wood caused by Fungi. It can weaken the wood in homes and buildings that  cause structural damage.

DRY ROTS are like a cancer, they progress very slowly. If dry rot is not caught in time, it can have devastating consequences to your investment and pocket book.

In some geographical areas where climate is commonly wet, structures may show signs of Dry Rot that can be spotted by Dry Rot Home Inspectors. Structures that show signs of dry rot may cause future problems for you and your home. This home repair should be taken care of as soon as possible.

DRY ROT Inspection Advantages:

DRY ROT inspections are performed in almost all home inspections. The inspection will give you a snapshot of any potential issues and give the builder an opportunity to repair any issues found. It can also help you mitigate issues prior to selling or prior to performing any major landscaping.

DRY ROT inspections reduce the surprises that generally don’t show up until well after the sale has been completed; sometimes years. It will give you an opportunity to mitigate potential future problems and protect your investment.

If a DRY ROT issue is discovered one of the best ways to reduce the effects are to improve drainage and air circulation around and under the home. Removal of the conductive conditions can save you a lot of grief.

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with a DRY ROT Inspection.

Getting a Condo Inspection

Jan - 14 2017 | no comments | By

condo inspection

Do you need a Condo Inspection?

Getting a condo inspection with VanPort Property Inspection can avoid ‘surprises’ prior to closing. Condo inspections reduce the surprises that generally don’t show up until well after the sale has been completed. It will give you an opportunity to mitigate potential future problems after the sale.

Do I need a Home Inspection on a Condo?

The main purpose of a Home Inspection is to make sure there is nothing wrong with the Condominium before buying. So yes you should definitely make sure your new condo is inspected before buying. Having a home inspection done on a condo is a bit different than having an inspection done on a house.  Normally, your condo home inspection will not have the common elements inspected by the home inspector. The common elements being the whole building. Your inspection will be for just your unit verses the whole building.

New Condo Inspection Advantages:

Condo inspections and new condominium inspections are performed just prior to closing. The inspection will give you a snapshot of any issues and give the seller an opportunity to repair any issues found prior to close of the transaction.

Builders have several things riding on their sale to you. Primarily their reputation which could further complement their product and workmanship. Word of mouth and social media exposure, both good or bad can help them tremendously.

Builder Inspections

Builders build to code, that doesn’t necessarily translate into functionality. Failure to install flashing, complete caulking of points of intrusion, wood debris left in the crawl space or any number of things can lead to costly repairs or loss of value in the long run.

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with a CONDO Inspection.

You may also want to Read these articles:

First time home buyers Inspection

Aging in Place Inspection

 

First Time Home Buyers Inspection

Jan - 14 2017 | 1 comment | By

First time home buyers Inspection

Do you need a First time Home Buyers Inspection?

Getting a first time home buyers inspection by VanPort Property Inspection can help you traverse your way through the buying experience.  Most first time Home buyers use a Realtor to help them navigate through the complex process. Realtors then rely on Home Inspectors to ensure that they represent the home properly. Home inspectors aid in the closing of the real estate transaction.

Process of the first time home buyer inspection:

Buying your first home can be very exciting and it may also cause a lot of anxiety. The process is complex and most of us don’t have time to deal with the various and interested parties or requirements to purchase. So having a Reliable Home Inspector will make a huge difference in your journey. Your Home Inspector will take off a tremendous amount of stress by performing his/her home inspection. Having your first home inspection can give you an excellent platform from which to operate in any future transactions; whether it be sales or purchase.

The best thing you can do as a first time home buyer is to make sure your Realtor hires a dependable and knowledgeable Home Inspector. Ask many questions during your home inspection but don’t get in the way of the Home Inspector. Most home inspectors are very thorough and need space to do their jobs.

What will the first time home buyer inspection tell you?

Your first time home inspection will give you assurance that the items below have been examined for functionality and safety:

Drainage, Foundation & Flat work, Exterior defects & flaws, Interior defects & flaws, Appliance inspection & testing, HVAC examination & testing, Pest inspection and an overall assessment of the homes potential repair/ maintenance concerns.

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with a FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS Inspection.

Aging in Place Inspection

Jan - 14 2017 | 1 comment | By

Aging in Place Inspection

Aging in Place

“Aging in place” is the opportunity for seniors to live comfortably in their homes as long as possible without having to enter a care facility or live with family members; even though these may be viable options. By having your home inspected for an “aging in place” through VanPort Property Inspection  you may not have to move from your present residence to live in your home. It may also defer your need to seek support services and can enable your care givers to better manage your needs in your own home in response to life changes. Do you need an Aging in Place Inspection?

The 60’s, 70’s & 80’s Generations

As we age, there will be roughly 65-80 million by 2020. Those from the 60’s will live differently than their parents’ generation.  They will seek care in their own homes and will be less likely to move into congregate living settings because of a more active lifestyle that may not have been maintained by their parents.  They will want more amenities and probably looking at downsizing their needs earlier than their parents.

Why might you prefer to age in place?

Nursing homes are exceedingly expensive; monthly care can run from $3,000 to $7,000 per month.  This for many of us limit your ability to remain active and enjoy your lives on your own terms.

Aging-in-Place Inspections:  What do we look for?

We look at and suggest modifications to bathrooms, entryways, maintenance, counters, storage, lighting, security, non-slip flooring, stairways and windows.

If you are considering ‘age in place’:

  • Talk with family members, doctors and friends.
  • Do you want to downsize or stay put.
  • Examine your finances and income.
  • Remodel, replace or downsize before your mobility becomes an issue. If you decide to ‘age in place’ start the transition early so there won’t be a large financial impact.

In summary, aging in place is a way by which senior citizens can avoid being dependent on others due to declining health and mobility. VanPort Property Inspection can help you make an assessment.

 

VanPort Property Inspection can help you with an AGING IN PLACE Inspection.

Article summarized from InterNACHI Home Inspectors website www.InterNACHI.com.  ‘Aging in Place’ by Nick Gromicko, 2015.